Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Keep that plastic moving

When you have accomplished any studying about recycling plastic at all aside from just learning to put in a recycling bin, you may have doubtless come across the growing debate and work on the different processes of plastic recycling. With plastics, all issues are not developed equal. Plastics with diverse utilizes normally have wildly distinct chemical and polymer compositions. This indicates that they cant be utilised for the same merchandise and much more importantly, cant be recycled the same way. If a recycling center had been to throw all the different types of plastics into 1 recycling procedure, the end result would be a mess of plastics in various stages of melting and would most likely look a great deal like a culinary sauce gone wrong with water and oil separation. In other words, scientists and environmentalists need to come up with various processes for plastic recycling to obtain the job completed.
One of the greatest new and diverse processes of plastic recycling will be the function getting accomplished on biodegradable plastics. It seems like developing a plastic that could break down like a natural product is impossible, but a growing number of advances are getting made on a common basis. So far, one of the prospective troubles with this type of new plastic is that if it truly is mixed up with recycled plastic, the excellent of the resulting item suffers.
Recycling firms, most notably in the U.S., Australia, and Japan are tinkering using the idea of heat compression recycling for plastics. This version of a various process of plastic recycling works on the idea of taking all sorts and varieties of clean plastics, and we are talking about plastics from grocery bags to tough industrial plastics here, and placing them inside the identical tumbler. A tumbler is truly what it sounds like. Its a gigantic rotating drum which is reminiscent of your clothes dryer tumbler and mixing the loads together. The benefit is that all plastics may be recycled this way regardless of their sort. The greatest drawback is that this process takes a great deal of power to operate.
The world is still in its infant stage on the subject of secure, helpful, and productive recycling particularly in relation to plastic recycling. A distinct process will help 1 kind of plastic although it doesn't work for yet another. Really just put it is going to take time, trial and error, and also the dedication of a great deal of folks to get the processes where they should be. Inside the meantime, its as much as the everyday, ordinary folks to continue to do the very best job doable of recycling, reusing, and renewing.

Friday, July 20, 2012

Have a cup of coffee!

Europeans and Americans drink coffee like it is going out of style. Coffee is a popular social tool that has been around since any of us can remember. The popularity growth in coffee consumption has prompted many growers to experiment with how they grow coffee, especially in recent years when it has been proven that fertilizer does more harm than good. Organic coffee is on the horizon for them now.
Organic coffee - what is it exactly? This is coffee that is grown without using enhancement chemicals. It has been done that way since time before chemical companies intruded. Farmers plant the seeds, irrigate the roots and let the sun do the rest.
The Department of Agriculture has set into motion a crop rotation program. Crop rotation aids the farmer's in coping with the demand of coffee products on the open market, especially organic flavored coffee. One way that organic flavored coffee growers can benefit is by applying to the government for incentives. The agricultural community supports the growing of it wholeheartedly. So much so that they will give benefits to farmers who grow organic. It takes a while to get certified organic but to the coffee grower it is well worth the wait.
As with the majority of organic products, organic coffee takes more time to come to term. This means that organic coffee costs more than your general store brands. In some instances, 12 ounces of organic coffee can be sold for $1.00 per ounce.
Organic coffee, like other organic or all natural foods, is sold in an entirely different section of your local supermarket. This type of coffee is sold in caffeinated and decaffeinated as well as flavored with vanilla, chocolate hazelnut or anything else you can think of that regular coffee comes in. Organic flavored coffee (like other all-natural products) must contain a seal indicating it is, in fact, organic. This is an FDA classification and cannot be overlooked.
Granted, organic coffee is more expensive than traditional coffee, but the sense of wellness it brings cannot be unmatched. Many brands you find are not made in the US but in countries that support slavery and the use of warlords such as South America or Africa.
Organic coffee prices will go down over the next few years, analysts predict. This is made possible by the crop rotation practices mentioned earlier by avoiding using fertilizers and pesticides.
The use of organic coffee or other products will not allow you to live longer, that is a guarantee that cannot be made. These organic products can help you live healthier lifestyles. Healthier lifestyles can lead to longer life. So the next time that you are in the grocery store or other large food center look at all of the organic food you can buy and realize that you can be feeling better and living a healthier, more enriching life than you were before switching from non-organic foods to organic.
Organic flavored coffee will not disappoint. True it is more expensive but the benefits as well as the flavor more than compensates for the cost.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

Why should you make the switch to organic?

I try to encourage people to buy organic foods when they are available. The first excuse I often hear is that they cost more and that groceries already cost way too much. Another thing I hear is that my small effort will not make a difference, so why even bother? I also heard from one person that her spouse had read that everything that was labeled organic foods was not necessarily so. Is that true and, if so, how does a person know if he or she is really getting organic foods? There are alot of questions out there, so why buy organic foods? Read on!
These all seem like valid concerns, so I thought I would create the following FAQs to address these issues.
1. How can you be sure that food labeled "organic" are really organic? Use of the term "organic" is regulated by the United States government. In order to put the word "organic" on a food label, the farmer must get the product certified as organic by a USDA-accredited certifier. Those who falsely label or sell non organic foods as "organic" can be fined up to $11,000 for each violation.
2. What exactly does the word "organic" mean? On a food label, "organic" means the food was produced without pesticides or fertilizers, sewage, genetic engineering or irradiation. In the case of animal products, it also means the animal received no antibiotics or hormones and was fed organic feed containing no animal by-products. An organic label also means animals had access to outdoor facilities.
3. Is some food with an "organic" label more organic than others? Yes, among processed foods with multiple ingredients, those displaying the USDA organic seal have at least 95 percent organic content. Those labeled "made with organic ingredients" on the front may be as little as 70 percent organic. (The latter example can not be displayed the USDA's organic seal, but may be displayed with the logo of the certifying agent.)
4. Are organic foods better for the environment? Yes. By eliminating large amounts of pesticides and synthetic fertilizers used in farming, organic methods can help protect the health of our air, water and soil. It also does not add to the problem of antibiotic resistance, which makes antibiotics ineffective for treating illnesses in human beings. Antibiotic use in organically-raised animals is not allowed.
5. Are organic foods safer for us to eat? Yes. Unlike conventionally produced food, you to no synthetic pesticides or growth hormones. Many of these substances have been proven to cause cancer, birth defects and damage to the nervous and reproductive systems in animal studies (although at higher levels than commonly found in food). What has not been studied yet is whether or not exposure to low levels of these substances may also have adverse health effects. In the absence of this information, the best course of action is not to expose yourself to chemicals designed and proven to kill other life forms. This is especially true for children, as their developing body systems put them at much greater risk of harm than adults.
6. Are organic foods worth the extra money? Yes, in the sense that you really do get extra value in the form of safer food that is better for the environment. You might not be able to afford a regular diet of organic foods. If so, try picking and choosing your organic purchases. A study by the Environmental Working Group of 43 fruits and vegetables shows that you can reduce your pesticide exposure from produce by up to 90 percent by avoiding the twelve most contaminated fruits and vegetables and eating the least contaminated instead.
7. Will your purchases make a difference? Yes. The reason organic foods are now the fastest-growing sector of the food industry is that consumers have shown that they want it. There is no other way to promote this concept than by buying it and encouraging others to do the same.
8. Are organic foods always the best choice? No. Conventional food that is grown close to you may be a better choice than organic foods grown 1,000 miles away. Why? Because transporting food a short distance causes much less global warming pollution. That local farm is also preserving open space in your area and contributing to your local economy.
Why buy organic food? I hope you have learned alot of important reasons in the information above. Healthy choices mean healthy living. Healthy organic foods also mean healthy living.

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

How Green can you be!

Let's go green. Green is a healthy color but some might just be taking this color and drive for granted. Let us indeed go green for we all know what is happening with our world today, let us help save it. As I've said, we have to begin taking care of our environment today to preserve it for the future generation. So where do we begin? Start in your own abode! Make it a point to exercise green apartment living/ How should you do it?
Let us go green apartment living by doing it ourselves. This may sound easy for people who enjoy plants and know how to toil, but difficult for people who don't know anything at all. This is as easy as it sounds. Have a pot, put that seed within it then you're on the go. But please don't stop there, it is really important to look after it as well. Love it and in return it will lead to good things back to you.
Recommend green by going local. Significant materials or foods or just anything at all that can be bought within the range of your area will certainly help a lot in circulating the money. You can buy from a carpenter or a farmer in your area and it will surely make use of your local resources to improve your community.
Recycling can be a style of going green. Recycling doesn't stop by just throwing the garbage out. Recycle or make a compost of the waste that are not of great use anymore and reuse things that are still reusable. This will definitely decrease your part in piling up the garbage in your community. It is much better to have less garbage because it helps our environment.
Planning helps you go green. Just a bit of changes in your shopping spree will contribute a lot to our environment. Bags that are used for shopping are significant and need be re used to reduce the pile. And if paper bags are not using post consumer materials then surely don't use them.
Second hands are not that bad. This says it all "One man's trash is another man's treasure." If it still can be used, then why not? This may still be valuable to another person.
Green apartment living can also be exercised in buying the correct light. Go green and save big on energy bills. Numerous options can be decided upon choosing the proper light, just make sure that you select that has it all. Light bulbs for example may come in cheap or costly items. You can save 75% of energy with light bulbs that are a bit costly. Plus it lasts longer than inexpensive bulbs do.

Tuesday, July 17, 2012

Pink Slime! It's what's for Dinner.


Here is a subject that is dear to my heart, pink slime.  For the past few months the suject has been all over the news.  People want to know if it is safe to eat.  It is beef, low cuts and grades, but it is beef by all legal standards.  They is just one difference between beef and pink slime.  Pink slime is treated with ammonia.  I know all of you treat all of your beef with ammonia.  That is sick.  Ammonia is not safe to drink, but you can treat ground beef with it and the product is safe.  Yeah, right! 
I love burgers, and most of you do as well.  When this came out I was not too surprised by what I heard.  Most of the food we eat daily is garbage anyway, so what is the surprise that the USDA says that it’s ok to sell and eat ammonia treated ground beef.  Below is the article from ABC News on their report on Pink slime.
“Pink slime,” a cheap meat filler, is in 70 percent of the ground beef sold at supermarkets and up to 25 percent of each American hamburger patty, by some estimates.
“It kind of looks like play dough,” said Kit Foshee, who was a corporate quality assurance manager at Beef Products Inc., the company that makes pink slime. “It’s pink and frozen, it’s not what the typical person would consider meat.”
The company calls the final product “Finely Textured Lean Beef.” It is flash frozen and boxed. Foshee says it is more like gelatin and not nutritious as ground beef because the protein comes mostly from connective tissue, not muscle meat.
“[It will] fill you up, but won’t do any good,” Foshee said.
ABC News was flooded with questions from concerned viewers following last night’s report on pink slime.
Many, like Dale Rittenhouse, wanted to know where beef with pink slime was sold.
“What stores use pink slime?” Rittenhouse wrote.
So ABC News producers traveled across the country to the meat section to see if its in the ground beef they sell. Most couldn’t tell us for sure.
“There is no way to even know from labels or even from the butchers here whether it contains pink slime,” said ABC News producer Candace Smith in New York.
“The guy at the meat counter said that he had been getting the same question all day,” said Janice McDonald in Atlanta.
ABC News emailed the top 10 grocery chains in America. Only Publix, Costco, HEB and Whole Foods responded, saying they don’t use pink slime. No word yet from the rest.
A viewer, Miles Herbert, wanted to know, “Is there any evidence that organic meat contains this pink slim?”
It turns out there isn’t. If your meat is stamped USDA Organic, it’s pure meat with no filler.
But critics say everything else is suspect because pink slime does not have to appear on the label. And the USDA is giving no indication it will force meat packers to lift the veil of secrecy any time soon.
The company calls the final product “Finely Textured Lean Beef.” It is flash frozen and boxed. Foshee says it is more like gelatin and not nutritious as ground beef because the protein comes mostly from connective tissue, not muscle meat.
“[It will] fill you up, but won’t do any good,” Foshee said.
ABC News was flooded with questions from concerned viewers following last night’s report on pink slime.
Many, like Dale Rittenhouse, wanted to know where beef with pink slime was sold.
“What stores use pink slime?” Rittenhouse wrote.
So ABC News producers traveled across the country to the meat section to see if its in the ground beef they sell. Most couldn’t tell us for sure.
“There is no way to even know from labels or even from the butchers here whether it contains pink slime,” said ABC News producer Candace Smith in New York.
“The guy at the meat counter said that he had been getting the same question all day,” said Janice McDonald in Atlanta.
ABC News emailed the top 10 grocery chains in America. Only Publix, Costco, HEB and Whole Foods responded, saying they don’t use pink slime. No word yet from the rest.
A viewer, Miles Herbert, wanted to know, “Is there any evidence that organic meat contains this pink slim?”
It turns out there isn’t. If your meat is stamped USDA Organic, it’s pure meat with no filler.
But critics say everything else is suspect because pink slime does not have to appear on the label. And the USDA is giving no indication it will force meat packers to lift the veil of secrecy any time soon.

Monday, July 16, 2012

I'm still here.

I just wanted my readers and followers to know that I have not left the blogging world.  I have had other stuff to work on and some things to happen.  Don't worry I have lots of information that I'll be writing about.

I have been changing the look of the blogs again.  I think it will be the last time.  Sit back and read all info that I'll be sharing with you on all of my blogs.  Yes, all five will be updated this week.  I may have some more blogs coming.  I have a few I'll be working on.
Thanks for all of the love and time that you spend on my blogs.

Enjoy,

Tyler